Employee Access

Neenah-Menasha Fire Rescue FAQS

Why Does a Fire Truck Show Up At Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Calls?
Why does an emergency vehicle respond with lights and sirens and then turn them off sometimes?
Who buys the food the firefighters eat while they are on duty?
Did you know our firefighter’s daily shift includes:
Why are there so many people at a structure fire?
What is an ISO rating and how does this affect me?

Why Does a Fire Truck Show Up At Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Calls?

Our firefighters are also certified first responders and render care before the ambulance arrives.
There are times when our firefighters continue to assist ambulance personnel due to the extra assistance that may be needed for the call. Some of these calls include cardiac and respiratory emergencies, seizures, strokes, diabetic emergencies, overdose allergic reactions, and traumatic injuries.

In addition, we must keep our engine company together because other emergencies can occur at any time and we will not know what resources we will need until we arrive on scene. Our fire trucks are like big “tool boxes” and emergency situations are never the same. By keeping all of our resources together this ensures getting important resources, and staff, to the call quicker.

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Why does an emergency vehicle respond with lights and sirens and then turn them off sometimes?

On occasion, when responding to emergencies the first arriving engine or dispatch may relay additional information that causes us to down grade our response to a non-emergency mode or even cancel the call and we will return to service.

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Who buys the food the firefighters eat while they are on duty?  Our fire stations are the firefighter’s “home away from home” when they are working.  Local 275 Firefighters purchase the following items to use while they are at work:  daily meals, bedding, newspaper, grills/propane, televisions and cable.

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Did you know our firefighter’s daily shift includes:  cleaning our stations, lawn care and snow removal?

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Why are there so many people at a structure fire?  Our Department follows industry standards set by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  One standard establishes the minimum number of firefighters needed to safely fight a fire.  That number is 14.  There are many jobs and functions that need to be completed at structure fires.  This includes, but its not limited to, the following:

  • One firefighter as the Incident Commander.  This is required as the person who is in charge of the incident and who is making strategic decisions.
  • Minimum of two firefighters on the main attack hoseline.  The main attack “line” is the first line into a building to attempt to put water on the fire and extinguish it.
  • Minimum two firefighters on the main back-up hoseline.  This is the second attack “line” that is there to provide support to the main or first attack line.
  • Minimum of two firefighters to search a building.  One of the primary goals is to ensure the house or building is cleaer of people or occupants.
  • Minimum of two firefighters for ventilation.  Ventilation is the process of removing smoke, heat, and fire gases from a building during and after a fire.  Depending upon the type of ventilation, size of the fire, etc. sometimes more firefighters are needed.
  • Minimum of one firefighters to establish a water supply.  Our main source of water comes from fire hydrants.
  • One firefighter assigned to operate the fire pump on our apparatus at the scene.  The pump cannot be operated without a driver standing by to make sure things are working.  This can directly endanger crews working inside on the attack lines.
  • Minimum of two firefighters assigned to the Rapid Intervention Team.  This team of firefighters is there to provide immediate rescue assistance to any firefighter who becomes trapped, lost inside a building or any other issue that may come up at the scene.
  • Minimum of one firefighter assigned to disconnect the utilities.

Additional firefighting responsibilities may include:

  • One person to operate the aerial ladder, if needed.
  • Additional firefighters on attack lines if the fire grows.
  • Additional firefighters needed for any reason due to the size of the fire.

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What is an ISO rating and how does this affect me?  ISO stands for Insurance Service Offices and one of their services is the Public Protection Classification System which is referred to as an ISO rating for each municipality.  The rating represents the effectiveness of fire protection in a municipality on a scale of one through ten.  Class One is superior fire protection and Class Ten meets no minimum criteria.  This rating is used by insurance companies as a factor when setting insurance premiums for homeowners and businesses.  NMFR’s rating for the Cities of Neenah and Menasha is a two.

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